Monday, August 15, 2011

Transfer Images Using Freezer Paper

It was purely by accident that I figured out this method of transferring a printed image.  It is simple to do and you don't need any special paper or products!  If you can print it from your computer then you can transfer it to a fabric or wood surface.

Now, this project I am about to show you is not very exciting, but it will give you the idea of how the transfer is done...so here it goes.

I decided to cover my old and dirty mouse pad that looked like this:


I used canvas and cut a piece a bit larger that than the mouse pad. 



Then I cut a piece of "Heat n Bond" the same size as the canvas and, following the instructions, adhered it to the back of my fabric.  When it cooled, I removed the paper backing. 




I then centered the mouse pad onto the back of the canvas and, again, using my iron, adhered the canvas to the top of the mouse pad.  I then wrapped the excess canvas to the back of the pad and used my iron to attach the edges.





I cut a piece of macramae jute and secured it to the edge of the pad using hot glue.






So, now you know how I covered the mouse pad...onto how to do the transfer.

You will need freezer paper, 8 1/2" x 11" paper, spray adhesive, ink jet printer and your imagination.


Cut a piece of freezer paper a bit larger than your standard-sized paper.  Spray your paper with spray adhesive and lay on the "paper side" of your freezer paper leaving the waxy side exposed.




Trim the excess freezer paper using sissors.  You now have a "reusable" sheet of transfer paper for all your projects. 

I found the italian postage image from "The Graphics Fairy" and set my printer to "mirror image".  You will need to print the image on the "waxy" side of your paper.  (be careful not to smudge the image)



Now, wet the surface you are transferring too, however, your only want to "slightly" dampen the surface, not soak it!  I dampened the top of the mouse pad with a sponge.  Place your image on the surface and "burnish" using the back of a spoon until you have rubbed the entire image surface.   Carefully lift the paper off and there you have it...an image transfer!


I kinda rushed through this project because I was excited to share it with you so, as you can see, I didn't quite center my image onto mouse pad.  Also, my pictures are not very good...very dark and they don't show the true colors.  Sorry, but I hope you get the idea!  Oh...and before I forget I mentioned that the paper is "reusable"... once you transfer your image you can simply wipe the "waxy" side with a damp cloth to remove any remaining ink.  You now have a clean surface to print a new image for a new project.




As I mentioned, this method works well on wood as well, so I will be sharing a wood transfer project in the next day or two.  Until then, thank you for stopping for a visit! 

Lesa

193 comments:

  1. love this tutorial - looks great!
    thanks.
    cheryl xox.

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  2. This looks great! You are so creative! I love the transformation.

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  3. I can't wait to try it! Thanks for the tute!
    Susan

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  4. Great idea, I hope I'll try it too!
    Debbie

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  5. Thanks for the tip! Can't wait to try it.

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  6. Thanks!! I have got to try this too~

    Nancy

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  7. Gotta grab me some freezer paper and give this one a try for SURE! That's too cool for school.

    Visiting from Coastal Charm- Nifty Thrifty Tues Linky Party,
    ~Suzanne in IL

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  8. that is so cool! love how it turned out. thanks for sharing this at my party!

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  9. wow, thanks for sharing, just found your blog. I signed up to follow please come by and sign up to follow my blog. I love making new blog friends. Kim :o)

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  10. GREAT tutorial! Thanks!
    ~Angela

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  11. This is the easiest way to transfer images that I have seen so far, thanks!

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  12. Wow! What a great idea! I love the print you chose. I have a party going on over at my blog if you want to join! I'd love to have you! Check it out under the "Stache Party" page on my blog: mylilpumpkinpatch.blogspot.com

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  13. This is so cute -- your mouse pad is adorable! I found and used a similar method using label sheets. They are naturally 'waxy' and fit perfectly into the printer. I only used this on wood though and didn't dampen the wood so I'm curious to see your wood project(s). Would the spray mist be a problem on the wood? Will sure be checking back to see what else you come up with! Thanks for sharing!

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  14. I am so glad that you posted this!!!! This will be perfect for transferring images for embroidery. thank you!

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    Replies
    1. Christine I never thought of that! Thanks for the idea! of using this for embriodery

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  15. I love this! I've been wanting a good tutorial for how to do this! I'm both pinning it and featuring it next week! Thanks so much for linking to Thrifty Thursday! :)

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  16. Really nifty. Thanks for teaching how to do it.

    Warmly, Michelle

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  17. Hey I'm Kassandra! I featured this here at my blog. I hope you'll come by and grab a button!

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  18. How I'm loving this! You described the process perfectly too!

    Shared this on FJI Facebook for SNS 95. :)

    http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150338729201141&set=a.192514281140.164586.175378011140&type=1&theater

    Donna

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  19. What a great technique. Thanks for sharing this and your "new" mousepad looks great.

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  20. Way to go! How creative and reusable too? Does this mean freezer paper should now be available in craft stores?

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    1. yeah, but it would be more expensive then! Grocery store prices rock! btw, freezer paper specifically for quilting/crafting is sold in multiple pre-cut sizes (I bought both the 8.5x11 (letter) and 8.4x14 (legal) sizes from Soft Expressions dot com). avoids that annoying curl found with freezer paper by-the-roll. Brand names: C. J. Jenkins, June Taylor, C&T Publishing. Amazon also carries a selection

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  21. That's brilliant!! Thank you so much for sharing your tip and linking up to It's a Party!

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  22. Love it lesa... nice tutorial.keep blogging and crafting...

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  23. Love the tutorial! Used it here:

    http://bluecedarlane.blogspot.com/2011/08/vintage-french-postmarks-and-furniture.html

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  24. Visiting from A-Z, this is a really great tip! Thanks!

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  25. Oh thank you for this simple tutorial. I need to make some labels for my knit/crochet gifts for christmas. I think this is a perfect solution to buying them!
    Lisa

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  26. I just featured you on my Facebook page today...I was going crazy trying to find this tutorial....So glad I finally found it....:) gonna try this soon...
    thanks
    Karin
    www.artisbeauty.net

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  27. I love this idea! I discovered the same thing by printing on an overhead transparency sheet. I was SO excited about my discovery, until I realized that (on wood projects) trying to poly them re-dissolved the ink and smeared everything. Does the same thing happen to you? Or have you figured out another way to protect the image? I'm also wondering...have you washed any of the fabric images? Is there a way to make them colorfast?

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  28. WOW! that is amazing! I never knew you could transfer images like that! thanks for the tutorial!

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  29. that is just so cool.. I always have freezer paper and I cant wait to try this. Thanks for sharing,, I love your mousepad.

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  30. Astounding! I HAVE GOT to try this! Thanks for sharing your incredible secret!

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  31. Freezer paper??? Never heard of it but I'm looking into the UK equivalent. Thanks for this idea.

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    1. Linda, check quilt shops or online sites. I think I saw some freezer paper at one of them a few years ago.

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    2. butcher paper maybe? freezer paper is basically brown paper with a plastic-y coating on one side :)

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  32. Could that be wax paper or baking paper in Europe? Great tutorial thanks so much, I want to try this too : )

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    1. Freezer paper is in the grocery store in the section that has aluminum foil, saran wrap, wax paper. It's a rather long box and it's great for other crafts as well, some are included on the box.

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    2. Freezer paper is in the grocery store in the section that has aluminum foil, saran wrap, wax paper. It's a rather long box and it's great for other crafts as well, some are included on the box.

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  33. Oh here's some more info I found about it...
    http://www.makeit-loveit.com/2011/01/what-is-freezer-paper.html

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  34. fabulous!!! thanks so much for shring this great idea and i sure will link to you when i get my transfer done. I am busy trying to get decor done for our new home that we will be moving in to on the 1st November and have searched for inspiration just EVERYWHERE! thanks again for the tips and inspiration
    smiles
    Paola

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  35. I love to learn something new and this is really cool. I am thinking of project now that I want to try this on! Thanks!

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  36. Can't wait to try this! Thank you!
    your mouse pad is sooooo cute!

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  37. I think I'm missing something. I've tried canvas- too blurred. I've tried wood- a little better, but still no dice. What am I missing? Is it a brand of freezer paper? I know tighter weave of fabric can help, but I'm at a loss.

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    1. Hi Rawr. I think its the fact that she dampened the fabric or wood. If you dont and you use a dry surface it will cause the colors to bleed/run. The fabric is soaking up the ink like a sponge. That is why you wet it first but not to much but if you dont wet it enough it will still run. Does that make sense? Hope that helps.

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    2. If you are using art canvas, it might help to gesso it first. Also, I'm not convinced it's necessary to wrap the canvas behind the mouse pad. Heat-n-Bond does a really great job of sealing in the frays in my own experience.

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  38. I'm your newest follower and so glad I ran across it! Love the simple tutorial on the freezer paper transfer. I have a link party going on...I'd love it if you shared a project! www.projectqueen.org
    Enjoyed your blog. Can't wait to see what your next project will be.

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  39. Anyone who can share this should be followed (smile). I'm a new follower and thanks for sharing. Please visit when you have a chance. http://decoratingwcents.blogspot.com/

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  40. Awesome!!!! I had to pin this on a board on my Pinterest linking it back to your blog!!! You should be getting more traffic soon!!! Thanks for sharing this clever idea!!
    http://pinterest.com/iloveboxes/clever-ideas/

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  41. Thanks so much for this tutorial and the detailed step by step. I need all the help I can get, haha. It's a pleasure to find a less expensive way of doing things.

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  42. This sounds great, gonna try it 2moro....many thanks.

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  43. That is awesome! What a fun discovery

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  44. Love this freezer paper transfer method for ink jet printers....can't wait to try it!
    Thanks!
    patti

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  45. Awesome!! I am forever trying to find an easier way to transfer an image. :D Love that mouse pad, great job!

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  46. I am rummaging through my kitchen drawers right now looking for some freezer paper. Can't wait to try this. Many thanks!

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  47. OMG, I just tried this and it was A-Mazing! Thank you so much!

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  48. Love it! Will have to try it soon! Thanks!

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  49. Found this on Pinterest & I love your tutorial!

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  50. Works extremely well on my Mixed Media project - thank you!

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  51. looks like alot of fun to do. can't wait to try it. thanks for good instructions on how to.

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  52. TOTALLY awesome!! Thank you so much for sharing!

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  53. I knew there was a simple & cheap way to transfer with either a xerox or print. My mother in law wants a quick easy way to transfer a candlewicking pattern. You don' t need much ink and it would be a waste of iron on paper. Thanks!

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  54. Thanks so much for this. Just wondered though, is there a way to make the ink set so that it is washable? I'm thinking linen cushion covers...

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    1. Wendy, did you find out if it's washable? I want to make pillow covers. What are you wanting to make?

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    2. Did anyone ever figure out if this process is washable? I'm also wanting to try it on pillows and possibly tshirts. :)

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    3. I was looking for this answer too.

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  55. Absolutely wonderful tutorial. Can't wait to go get the freezer paper.

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  56. Your mouse pad is awesome! For this project you can also print on the backing from a label / sticker sheet...like what address labels are stuck to. Cuts out the spray adhesive step...

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  57. I just love it! Such a smart girl you are. Thank you for sharing!
    Elyse @ Shabby Sweet Tea

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  58. This is very useful information. I can't wait to try this out. I think it would be neat to try it on my girls bedroom furniture.

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  59. Thank you, thank you, thank you!!! You have just simplified my life SO much with this tutorial! Now I can finish a project that had me totally stressed out!

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  60. can't wait to try this... great tutorial! Thanks!

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  61. Does it have to be an ink jet printer or can you use a laser printer also? Love this project!

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    1. Laser printer - EEK - NO! because your freezer paper will melt to the print drum and Bad Things Will Happen. I would hope all you would lose would be the toner cartridge, but you might ruin the printer itself. Because: that really useful waxy/plastic coating that makes it possible to transfer the ink in this tutorial MELTS. Freezer paper is regular paper bonded to a plastic coating. That makes it great for all sorts of applications where you want it to melt (like when ironing applique patterns to fabric (sticks nicely and then peels off later)). Not so great when melting would be Bad. Like in hot laser printers.

      Ink jet printers don't use heat to transfer ink from cartridge to paper, so they can safely print on freezer paper. Really, really important to keep laser printers and freezer paper apart.

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  62. "Cut a piece of freezer paper a bit larger than your standard-sized paper. Spray your paper with spray adhesive and lay on the "paper side" of your freezer paper leaving the waxy side exposed."

    Maybe I'm dense, but which side do you spray with the adhesive?...wax or paper side?

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    1. You spray the adhesive on the printer paper, not the freezer paper. Then put the printer paper, adhesive side down on the non-waxy side of the freezer paper. Hope that helps

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  63. I think she means spray the "paper" side and attach your regular 81/2 x 11 sheet of paper to your freezer paper. You will then put in your printer so it prints on the wax size of your freezer paper. you are attached a standard size sheet of paper to freezer paper so it will go through your printer.

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  64. This is very cool! thank you for sharing.

    http://www.cherylsdelights.com

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  65. If you transfer onto fabric, is the fabric able to be washed without the image fading?

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  66. Thanks for this tutorial, I cant wait to try! I also wonder if this will be able to transfer on fabric (cotton t-shirt?) If anyone has tried that I would love to hear how it turned out.

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  67. I was very disapointed. I tried this on wood about 10 times and each time it came out splotchy and bled around the letters. :(

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  68. I do funky painted furniture and when I use some paint pens (even Copic markers which are alcohol based) they bleed....unless you seal them very lightly with a spray poly (I try to use the same brand as what I am brushing for the final coat) over the printing a couple of times prior to brushing poly on the whole piece. Even then, I am careful not to overwork that area with the brush...Yes..I learned the hard way.

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  69. I am so eager to get home today, so I can try this method. I already have all the supplies, and I pondered all day yesterday about how to create a couple of outfits for my FIRST GREAT- GRANDSON who is celebrating his FIRST birthdate on tomorrow July 20, 2012. Now what I need you to do Lesa,is wrap your arms around yourself, and squeeze real tight. THANKS.

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  70. Did this work with the wood when you tried it? Sounds very interesting!

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  71. I love it and I so want to do this! (don't tell anyone that you rushed and didn't center it, it looks great!)
    Susan
    Homeroad.net

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  72. Awesome! I shall now go forth and make onesies for every baby that I know. Which is approximately 1 million.

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  73. If I were to do use this on a shirt would it just wash off? or would it bond good enough with the fabric? and does it matter how long you wait between printing and transferring? or does the dry ink still transfer well? Awesome idea and thanks for sharing!

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  74. I also want to know if it is washable when done on fabric...

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  75. Thank you for the cool idea

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  76. Replies
    1. I'd like to know this, too. Maybe we just need to test it to see?

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    2. I made my child a shirt that says only child expiring feb. 2013 and i had bought hanes cotton t's to transfer the image to. it took me 3 shirts and i finally got it but i washed the other 2 RIGHT AWAY in attempt to get it back to a white tee. and it didnt fade it at all. i used laundry soap, fabric softner and bleach in my washer with them. and the first 2 i did the ink had bled so now i have one good one and 2 with splochy ink in that saying. haha! i think i will be tye-dying those. =) hope that helps!

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    3. It may depend on the printer. I have a Cannon Artisan 830 and the ink dries waterproof on a photo almost immediately. I tried to wet one once for effect and it would not smear. I had an older HP that would wash off with water.

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    4. Once the transfer is dry I would iron it to set the image. I use to do this on painted t-shirts.

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  77. Found your project on Pinterest. So cool! Thanks for sharing. I will repin.

    http://cinnamonpink.typepad.com/

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  78. what kind of printer? ink or laser?

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  79. What a great idea!! Thanks for this great tutorial.

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  80. Great job explaining! Very clear.

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  81. Great job explaining! Very clear.

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  82. Great job explaining! Very clear.

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  83. Great job explaining! Very clear.

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  84. This is fabulous!! Thank you for sharing

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  85. this is a great project! feel,free to stop over and join in with it at my linky party on friday!

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  86. I want to make a shirt... Do I need to wet te shirt too??? Do I follow the same steps you did???

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  87. when you do the next tutorial, would you do it in video?

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  88. I'm just trying to understand... So, you cut out the freezer sheet and on the non-waxy side you spray the adhesive? What is the purpose of that? And when you rub the spoon to transfer, does the spoon have to be warm? Thank you for any extra help :) I'm wanting to make a shirt for Christmas.

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    1. if i understood correctly, you spray the paper side of the freezer paper to adhere it to a regular piece of paper, to feed it thru the printer

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  89. I came here from Karen's at The Graphic Fairy DIY site and I just cannot wait to try this on flour sacks to make pillows with. Your tutorial was great and very clear to understand...I'm gonna come back and check out the rest of your site! Thanks for sharing this great tutorial!
    Crafty Hugs,
    Pendra
    pendrasplace.blogspot.com

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  90. Thank you, thank you, thank you for sharing this transfer method! I have spent many late night hours trying to find a way to transfer a pattern to fabric that didn't involve an Xacto blade and/or stenciling! I can't wait to try this out!

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  91. Not sure if anyone has mentioned this already, but this method WILL NOT WORK if you are using a laser printer. You need to be using a photo printer.

    I figured this out the hard way, but hopefully I can spare others a similar fate with this message.

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    Replies
    1. Oh, and I would also recommend using a credit card or something similar instead of a spoon for pressing the image on. It applies more even pressure.

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  92. Love this - Will have to do this some day.

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  93. This is great! I can hardly wait to try it.

    Thanks so much.

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  94. What a simple but great idea, I will be trying this craft very soon

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  95. I just tried this and after several attempts got it to work without smearing or having the paper get jammed in the printer. I like it overall but the image seems very light. I did dampen the fabric. Any other suggestions to make it darker?

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  96. The rope edge looks very uncomfortable. Looks like it would irritate your wrist alot.

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  97. I'm a quilter and we use freezer paper all the time. But never heard of this.

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  98. I'm a quilter and we use freezer paper all the time. But never heard of this.

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  99. Most of these types of projects (tutorials) say right away 'not for inkjet' type printers but laser type makes better transfer for this type of project.

    saves the reader (who wants to try the project) a lot of wasted time and materials!

    Which was used for this project?

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  100. Thank you so much for the tutorial. Your project turned out great.

    FTI of your readers. In the event they required a transfer that calls for a laser copy; they can TRY putting their inkjet copy into the freezer for a few days prior to using it. Apparently by doing this, it fixes the ink so it does not bleed when a finish is applied over the completed project to seal it. ie: A decoupage project. -Brenda-

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    Replies
    1. Are you saying to put the freezer paper in the freezer before tranfering?

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  101. Its really a great art to transfer images in this way.

    CleanTech Patent News

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  102. Thanks so much for sharing this idea! I'm going to use it on Burlap to give it an antique feel.

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  103. Was this printed using an inkjet printer?

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  104. Thanks for this great tutorial. What a great way to use your inkjet printer.

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  105. Thanks for this great tutorial. What a great way to use your inkjet printer.

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  106. I started with the Citrasol method (dislike having to go out and find a toner copier) and moved on to the freezer paper method. Neither are quite as easy as I imagined them to be.

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  107. Thank you for this tutorial! I've had it pinned for a while, and just got the chance to try it out on a small burlap banner project.
    It worked out perfectly, and I'm very happy with the results. (Since I was doing letters on a dark colored burlap, I went over the letters with a black Sharpie to get my final result.)
    www.journeyswithjuju.blogspot.com

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  108. Will this method cause the image to be shiny?

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  109. OK-I tried this process yesterday but didn't have the info with me at the time. I forgot the "dampen object you are transferring the image to" part. It is a very faint image when you do that "dry" so I cannot wait to try it again.

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  110. Can You Use Wax Paper Instead Of The Freezer Paper?

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  111. Can You Use Wax Paper Instead Of The Freezer Paper?

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  112. How neat. I will have to try this. I have an ugly mouse pad that will be my first project using your infomation. Thanks for sharing.

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  113. Gee thanks for showing me that. I was wondering how to put a picture on to some pillow slips. Now I know!

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  114. Thank you, I love this!! I can do so much with this idea and it also is saving me money. I am now a new follower. God Bless You!!

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  115. I would probably use my iron to "heat set" the image before using it.

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  116. did you know you can cut the freezer paper a size that will fit in your printer, cut a piece of fabric that same size, iron your fabric to the waxy side of freezer paper for stability and run it through your printer and print directly on your fabric, when its done just peel off the freezer paper and iron the image to heat set it. I have tried this it works too

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    Replies
    1. Tried this and it worked perfectly too

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  117. I tried it on wood and it worked perfectly!

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    Replies
    1. How did you get it to work on wood? Thanks!

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  118. I cannot get freezer paper to go through the printer. Any suggestions?

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    Replies
    1. But thanks for this tutorial. Fantastic idea, if I can get it to go through printer

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  119. Check to see if your printer has a guage for thick paper like card stock, if so try adjusting your printer.

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  120. Thank you, thank you, thank you. I've got a lot of ideas and this just made my day.

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  121. Great project Lesa! I'm definitely going to try it. I'm following you via Google Friends Connect. I hope you follow me too. I can't wait to see this method on wood. Have a great weekend!

    Vashti
    http://vashtiqvega.wordpress.com

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  122. What did you need the spray adhesive for?

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  123. This sounds great will have to try it. Thanks for a great tutorial :O) Juli

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  124. Do you think this would work on a glass ornament?

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  125. Does this work with laser printers too?

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  126. Would this procedure work on plastic, like a cooler? I am thinking to design a cooler for my daughter with Lilly Pulitzer patterns, and I have zero artistic skills.

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  127. Would this procedure work on plastic, like a cooler? I am thinking to design a cooler for my daughter with Lilly Pulitzer patterns, and I have zero artistic skills.

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  128. So awesome. Wonderful tutorial. Great idea and thanks for sharing.

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  129. Looking at the Tranfer pic's this morning that was on pinterest......I Love You.... Thank YOU!!

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  130. Does anyone have a specific model of " cheap " printer this works well on? I tried it on my Epson and it did not work.

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  131. Great idea! So to put it onto a wood surface I just need to dampen the wood first then iron it on for 60 seconds? Thats all? Do I run the iron over the wood after taking the paper off also? Thanks in advance! :-)

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  132. Great idea! So to put it onto a wood surface I just need to dampen the wood first then iron it on for 60 seconds? Thats all? Do I run the iron over the wood after taking the paper off also? Thanks in advance! :-)

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    Replies
    1. You dont iron on wood. That's only for the fabric projects. For wood you would use a sealant...light coats of a spray sealant would be best.

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  133. 3-18-14 new find for me. . A few questions. Which printer was needed. Ink or laser? When u use the iron to set in the ink. . Do u iron on top of the image or on the back of the fabric? While still wet? Help?

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  134. 3-18-14 new find for me. . A few questions. Which printer was needed. Ink or laser? When u use the iron to set in the ink. . Do u iron on top of the image or on the back of the fabric? While still wet? Help?

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    Replies
    1. let the ink dry, then iron both sides. I'd use parchment paper (available in a grocery store - right next to the freeze paper!) or an applique pressing sheet between the sole plate of the iron and the fabric to prevent any ink from transferring to the iron.

      here is a link to a forum discussing pretreating the fabric for best picture quality: http://www.t-shirtforums.com/direct-garment-dtg-inkjet-printing/t89217.html

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  135. Quick question: Can I use a laser printer for this? I am afraid of putting freezer paper in the laser printer...Thanks!

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    Replies
    1. Laser printer - nope. Your instincts were right on target. Freezer paper will melt in a laser printer.

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  136. thanks so much for the tutorial! I can see using this technique for so many applications - embroidery and applique patterns for example. I also liked the comments from people who suggested using the waxy backing from sticker sheets (already cut to 8.5x11 size). I appreciate your sharing this with us!

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  137. It must be frustrating to have people ask the same questions over and over when the info is either already in the post...AND answered again...several times, in the comments. Yet still the same questions are asked. Now I know why some people post in really big letters "Please read all of post AND all comments prior to asking questions...you will find that most of the needed info is already here." LOL! That's coming from experience with this! Hahaha!
    Inkjet. Not laser. goodness. lol

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  138. I have a question for those of you who have done this multiple times w/ the same printer (since I will be using one that belongs to a graphic designer and don't want to mess it up in any way)-- after multiple printings on the plastic side of the freezer paper, was there ANY ill effects on the printer or the quality of prints afterwards???

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  139. I have tried this method three times on painted wood without any success -- it's ALWAYS blurry. I've noticed that when the image comes out of the printer, it is very clear but wet! Should I be letting it dry first? Or should I be printing out a less fine image? Any suggestions from others who have had good success with wood... PLEASE HELP.

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  140. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  142. I'm curious if you used an ink jet printer or a laser printer.

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  144. I was just wondering about using this method on t-shirts... when I wash them, how well does the ink hold up?

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  145. The transfer method seems fantastic and I look forward to giving it a try. I have read through the other posts but didn't notice a response to the question(s) about using "wax paper" instead of freezer paper. Would wax paper work? Apologies if I missed an earlier response to this question.

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  146. Lovely idea i really like it while i was searching for Toner Cartridge for Printers i found your blog i must try this at home thanks for sharing such a nice idea.

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